Seeking God’s Heart

David displays total reliant on God in the Psalms in response to dangers and attacks from enemies. He almost seems passive but we know he’s not. We should learn from how David seeks after God when he’s in trouble. We know from biblical accounts that when David’s army went to war, he fell into adultery, conspiracy, and murder in his affair with Bathsheba. He took someone Uriah loved from him and murdered him through a conspiracy with Joab. God took David’s beloved son from him but spared his life. From the Psalms, we know that David was contrite before God.

This tragic event gives us hope. I know I have and will continue to sin and there will be ugly and often irreversible consequences of my sins. God may or may not choose to alleviate us of the consequences of our sins but God will never stop loving us. For those who are willing to be trained by the hardships of life, they will eventually produce a harvest of righteousness and peace (Hebrews 12.1-11). We all sin and we all suffer from the consequences of our sins. That won’t change until Christ returns in glory or when we enter into God’s presence after our earthly life. Meanwhile, followers of Christ can join with God in his ministry of reconciliation and add to God’s kingdom and his righteousness in this fallen world, here and now. The critical issue is whether we seek after God’s heart and mind the way David does.

King David is a biblical hero not because of his own righteousness or moral standard. He is a biblical hero because he seeks after God’s heart and mind.

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